Developing a Global Perspective for Educators

Letters to Canada



Letters to Canada is a video documenting the thoughts of Canadian children on the unequal treatment of First Nations children in Canada. The video was produced by Dr. Cindy Blackstock (University of Alberta and First Nations Children’s and Family Caring Society) to be shown as an opening statement at the Human Rights Tribunal Hearing on First Nations Child Welfare that begins on February 25. Continue Reading…

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“Earth to Table”: Development and the Local Food Movement

Finale in DGPE Seminar Series 2012-2013
Wednesday February 20, 2013 — 1:00 to 2:30pm
(Location to be determined; Seminar is part of the Teaching Choices Symposium)

How can we as educators make connections to the Ontario curriculum in terms of addressing environmental sustainability, social justice, and human rights through a local food movement curriculum? As public awareness grows around the sociocultural, ecological and economic implications of global, transnational food corporations, we are witnessing a social movement here in Canada and abroad around a revitalization of Continue Reading…

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Fair Trade

New Lesson Plan on Human Rights, Environmental Sustainability & Fair Trade…
Fair Trade by Jackie Heim. Thank you Jennifer for sharing your ideas with us. Check out this and other great resources under Teachers Resources.

Lesson Description:
Fair trade sets out to create better trading conditions for farmers and workers in poor countries. This social movement started in the late 1940’s and seeks to address this inequity. With better working conditions and prices for their goods and less negative environmental impact people have a chance to improve their lives: feed themselves, send their children to school, and meet their basic needs which is the right of every person on this planet. Students will make a connection between hunger, poverty, and non-living wages; they will understand the concept of Fair Trade…

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Aboriginals and Early Settlers – Math Component

New Lesson Plan on Human Rights & the First Nations people…
Aboriginal and Early Settlers – Math Component by Riva Gewarges. Thank you Riva for the lesson plan submission. Check out this and other great resources under Teachers Resources.

Lesson Description:
The overall goal of this lesson is to introduce students to the concept of human rights by focusing on the historical and present impacts European colonization of Canada using mathematics. This lesson provides a basis which can then be expanded to allow students to read, describe, and interpret primary data presented in charts and graphs, including vertical and horizontal graphs.

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“Earth to Table”: Development and the Local Food Movement

Finale in DGPE Seminar Series 2011-2012
Wednesday, February 15th — 12:00 to 12:50pm (LMX 477)

How can we as educators make connections to the Ontario curriculum in terms of addressing environmental sustainability, social justice, and human rights through a local food movement curriculum? Continue Reading…

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Let Pharady Enjoy Her Childhood

New Lesson Plan on Human Rights & Child Labour…
Let Pharady Enjoy Her Childhood by Alina Orlea. Thanks to Alina for the lesson plan submission. Check out this and other great resources under Teachers Resources.

Lesson Description:
This lesson discusses children’s rights, and the contemporary situation of child labour across the world. It invites students to reflect on the premises of their childhood, to compare them with the ones from a developing country, and to take action by writing a letter in which they will ask the owner of a factory to address the situation. By performing this task, the students will enhance their ability to think critically, and they will practice their writing skills regarding how to edit a letter.

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I Know Why the Caged Bird Sings

New Lesson Plan on Human Rights!
Interpreting Meaning in Maya Angelou’s “I Know Why the Caged Bird Sings” by Mark Naser. Thank you, Mark for the lesson plan. Check out this and other great resources under Teachers Resources.

Lesson Description:
Students will learn how to interpret broader ideas from texts, specifically poetry. Focus will be given to Maya Angelou’s “I Know Why the Caged Bird Sings.” Students will consider how symbols work to maximize the effect – and meaning – of the poem. Also, students will explore the notion of being imprisoned, and consider how freedom is a fundamental human right regardless of one’s race or nationality.

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Hula Hooping for Health & Happiness

New Unit Plan on Environmental Sustainability & Human Rights!
Hula Hooping for Health and Happiness by Natalia Przednowek, Caring Gibner, Elise Milbradt, Yael Kolet & Emily Scott. Thank you to the group for contributing their lesson plan package. Check out this and other great resources under Teachers Resources.

Unit Plan Description:
This package reflects the goals of Developing a Global Perspective for Educators (DGPE) through our emphasis on the themes of environmental sustainability and human rights. It is designed for educators interested in incorporating global perspectives in their classroom. This resource offers introductory lessons for incorporating hula-hoops into grades 2-6 Ontario Health and Physical Education curriculum, as well as a cross curricular grade 5/6 exemplar and other cross curricular ideas! Hula-hooping can be used in the classroom as a non-competitive activity that promotes a link between the physical education curriculum and concepts of stability, locomotion, manipulation, body & spatial awareness, and general movement principles. These lessons are aimed to promote the enjoyment of movement to combat inactivity and promote environmental sustainability through an awareness of the materials used to create toys.

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Women’s Rights in Canada

New Unit Plan on Human Rights!
Women’s Rights in Canada by Amy Bridges. Thank you to Amy for the submission. Check out this and other great resources under Teachers Resources.

Unit Description:
How has the advancement of women’s rights in Canada shaped contemporary Canadian society? The essential question for this unit is centered around the issue and impact of the extension of human rights, which has enduring relevance for citizens of Canada. It draws attention to the ways in which social change is enacted through time, via the influence of individuals and collectives, which gives students a historical perspective on how to mobilize on social justice issues in the present.

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