Developing a Global Perspective for Educators

Aboriginals and Early Settlers – Math Component

New Lesson Plan on Human Rights & the First Nations people…
Aboriginal and Early Settlers – Math Component by Riva Gewarges. Thank you Riva for the lesson plan submission. Check out this and other great resources under Teachers Resources.

Lesson Description:
The overall goal of this lesson is to introduce students to the concept of human rights by focusing on the historical and present impacts European colonization of Canada using mathematics. This lesson provides a basis which can then be expanded to allow students to read, describe, and interpret primary data presented in charts and graphs, including vertical and horizontal graphs.

Add a comment

Walking for Water

New Lesson Plan on Environmental Education & Global Water Crisis…
Walking for Water by Joshua Finn. Thanks to Joshua for sharing the lesson plan with us. Check out this and other great resources under Teachers Resources.

Lesson Description:
This lesson is designed to incorporate an important global issue – the world water crisis – into the grade 7 math curriculum. Students will examine how accessible water is to them (in distance and in time) and determine their walking speed. This provides an opportunity to review the relationship between time, distance and speed to review conversion of units…

Add a comment

1.4 Billion Reasons

New Lesson Plan on International Development & Global Poverty…
1.4 Billion Reasons by Zeeshan Ghazali (Appendix: Population Datasheet) . Thank you Zeeshan for sharing your ideas with us. Check out this and other great resources under Teachers Resources.

Lesson Description:
As the global population has now reached 7 billion, the concern over sustainability has become critical. Naturally, poverty has emerged as a serious global issue, particularly because the most rapid population growth is occurring in the world’s poorest countries, and has resulted in over 1.4 billion people living in extreme poverty. By facilitating the compliation and comparison of population data, we can help students develop perspectives in the severity of the situation, and also engage them in the effort to eradicate extreme poverty within our lifetime.

Add a comment

Can You Count on Cans?

New Lesson Plan on Environmental Sustainability!
Can You Count on Cans? by Karine Longpré. Thank you to Karine for the submission. Check out this and other great resources under Teachers Resources.

Lesson Description:
This lesson is meant to be given after the class has participated in a food drive for their local shelter. In this lesson, the students will be asked to estimate how many items they have collected. They then will count and organize categorically into a chart all the non-perishable food items that they have collected for the Ottawa Mission (or shelter of choice). After having counted and organized the data into a chart, the students will be asked to determine how many people the food they have collected will feed, and how long it will last the Ottawa Mission. The lesson is meant to give students an appreciation of the food they have and to make them aware of how much food is needed to help the homeless. It will entice them to not waste as much of their food.

Add a comment

Meaningful Gifts

New Lesson Plan on Social Justice, Human Rights & Poverty!
Meaningful Gifts by Rosalie Emery. Thanks to Rosalie for the lesson plan. Check out this and other great resources under Teachers Resources.

Lesson Description:
Meaningful Gifts allows students to practice mathematical skills using whole numbers up to 1000 while doing an activity that is both relevant and realistic. After problem solving in small groups, the students will have the opportunity to purchase items (school supplies, sheep, chickens, etc.) from the World Vision catalogue that can be used to help children struggling with poverty. Finally, students will have the opportunity to share their rationale behind their chosen items.
Note: This lesson also includes a cross-cultural dimension on Human Rights which can be expanded into a unit. Students will discover how some children in other cultures/countries live in poverty, what that means, and how we can help. There is an emphasis on social justice by promoting discussion about issues such as equality, gender and human rights.

Add a comment

Save the Whales

New Lesson Plan on Environmental Stewardship!
Save the Whales? by Sunny Sunjung Lee. Thank you, Sunny for the submission. Check out this and other great resources under Teachers Resources.

Lesson Description
Dichlorodiphenyltrichloroethane (DDT), a synthetic pesticide used for agriculture causes severe harm on wildlife. Beluga whales, because they are at the top of the food chain, accumulate toxic DDT in its system and many have died of cancer as a result. Although its use has been banned in many developed countries, it is still used in some developing countries as a cure against Malaria. This lesson guides educators to introduce students to the issue of pollution (e.g., DDT) and consequent habitat alterations by integrating skills and knowledge from both science and mathematics: Students will learn to use data represented on graphs to communicate about global environmental issues. They will also engage in meaningful discussions to propose possible actions that take both national and international issues into consideration. Through the lesson, the concept of “global citizenship” will be taken up with the students.

Add a comment

How Much Are We Using?

New Lesson Plan on Environmental Sustainability!
How Much Are We Using? by Jennifer Rogers. Thank you, Jennifer for submitting your lesson plan. Check out this and other great resources under Teachers Resources.

Lesson Description
This lesson is aimed at getting the students to investigate environmental sustainability through consumption and recycling. Students will be investigating how much of a recyclable good it takes to create one new product (example: how many plastic water bottles does it take to make a new water bottle? A cellular phone?). Students will create a list of the quantities and then be responsible for sharing the information within the school by creating posters or dramatic skits to inform their peers of the importance of recycling and consumption.

Add a comment